CCNE Accreditation and School of Nurse Residency Programs

CCNE Accreditation and School of Nurse Residency Programs

Educational accreditation is a non-governmental, peer-reviewed process that includes the assessment of educational qualifications. Institutions and / or Nurse Residency Programs that use nationally recognized accreditation standards. Two forms of education. Accreditations are recognized in the United States (USA): institutional accreditation and professional or specialized accreditation.

Institutional accreditation deals with the quality and integrity of the entire institution, Assessment of the institution’s performance in fulfilling its own stated mission, goals and expected outcomes. Professional or specialist accreditation deals with courses of study in professional or vocational training
Fields.

Professional accreditation agencies assess the extent to which nurse residency programs fulfill their stated tasks, goals,
and expected results. This is important for the accreditation agency to determine the quality of the program
and the school preparation of the members of the profession.

Historical Overview of CCNE Nurse Residency Programs

1995: The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Accreditation Task Force was established.

Nurse Residency Programs
Nurse Residency Programs

1996: CCNE was founded by the AACN membership.

1998: The CCNE held its first meeting of its Board of Commissioners and for the first time on-site evaluations of bachelor’s and master’s degrees were carried out.

2004-2007: The CCNE Task Force on Nurse Residency Program Accreditation developed the standards for the accreditation of nurse residency programs.

2008: CCNE began accreditation of doctor’s office and post-graduate nurse residency programs.

2014-2015: The CCNE Standards Committee for Nurse Residency Programs proposed revisions to the accreditation standards for residency programs, which were approved by the CCNE Board in the summer of 2015. The new standards came into force on July 1, 2016.

2014: CCNE began accreditation of postgraduate APRN certificate programs.

2014-2015: The CCNE Standards Committee for Nurse Residency Programs proposed revisions to the accreditation standards for residency programs, which were approved by the CCNE Board in the summer of 2015. The new standards came into force on July 1, 2016.

2016-2017: CCNE Task Force examines APRN residency / fellowship programs and the need for appropriate accreditation.

2018-2019: NP Residency / Fellowship Standards Committee drafts accreditation standards for NP Residency / fellowship programs, paving the way for the CCNE to begin accreditation of such programs in 2020.

2020: CCNE convenes its Entry Level Nursing Standards Committee to review the entry level accreditation standards and propose revisions.

Accreditation Scope of The CCNE

The scope of the CCNE’s accreditation for nurse residency programs for entry-level practice includes:

  • All entry-level nurse residency programs (including those serving ADN-prepared residents)
  • Nursing home programs in all care facilities
  • Both employee-based nurse residency programs and government-funded internship programs for nurses (separately accredited)
  • Employee-based nurse residency programs hire newly licensed nurses as permanent employees of the health organization.
    Federally funded nurse training programs employ newly licensed nurses for the duration of the residency program with no obligation to continue working.

Application for Accreditation

To begin the accreditation process, the Chief Nurse Officer and Chief Executive Officer submit an application.

The application includes a description of the healthcare facility environment and nurse residency programs, demonstrates that the healthcare facility and academic partner are accredited, and provides an overview of the curriculum.

After staff review the application, the CCNE can contact the program with follow-up questions.

After the application is “accepted”, the program has two years to carry out an on-site evaluation.

Self Study

The nurse residency programs are required to conduct self-study on the quality and effectiveness of the program.

The process of self-analysis should result in the creation of an analytical document that takes into account all accreditation standards and key elements of the CCNE program.

The self-study document provides a solid understanding of how the program works and identifies strengths and areas for improvement.

The self-study document is used by the assessment team, the Residency Accreditation Committee (RAC) and the Board of Commissioners in their review and advice.

On-Site Assessment

The program selects the data for the evaluation, which typically takes place over a period of 2.5 to 3 days.The on-site evaluation is carried out in order to:

  • Assess the compliance of the program with the CCNE standards and key elements;
  • Validate the results and conclusions of the self-study document;
  • Gather information that will be used by the RAC and the Board of Directors to assess compliance with the standards; and
  • Review the process that program representatives have put in place to ensure continued self-improvement.

Team Report

The team report is an objective assessment of how well the program meets the standards and meets the key elements.The report is based on the team:

Nurse Residency Programs
Nurse Residency Programs
  • analysis of institutional documents and other materials provided by the program;
  • analysis of the information obtained during confidential interviews with the members of the program; and
  • observation of learning activities.

The team makes a written determination as to whether or not the program has met each standard and whether there are any concerns about meeting the key elements.

Even if there is a concern about meeting a key element, the general standard may still be met.

The team does not form a recommendation regarding nurse residency programs accreditation.

Several weeks after the on-site assessment, the team report is provided to the nursing director.The nursing director has the option of submitting a response to the team report. The answer can:

  • offer corrections of errors related to names, titles, data and other documentable facts;
  • offer comments that agree or disagree with the opinions and conclusions expressed in the report; and
  • provide any documentation that demonstrates additional progress made toward continual program improvement.

Standards for Accreditation Nurse Residency Programs

Standards for the Accreditation of Practice Entry Nursing Residency Programs

  • Four standards, 40 key elements
  • Standard I: 9 key elements
  • Standard II: 11 key elements
  • Standard III: 11 key elements
  • III-A: 6 key elements
  • III-B: 5 key elements
  • Standard IV: 9 key elements

Examples of evidence

Glossary

Standard I: Program Quality: Program Execution

The nursing care organization and academic programs implement the Entry-to-Practice Nursing residency program in a way that ensures a successful transition to practice for residents.

The healthcare organization and nursing academic programs provide qualified educators / teachers to enable
the practice entry nurse residency programs to achieve your mission, goals, and expected outcomes. The educators / teachers of the program are qualified and promote the achievement of the mission, goals and expected results of the program.

Standard II: Program Quality: Program Execution

Nursing care organization and academic programs implement the entry-to-practice nursing residency program in a way that ensures a successful transition to practice for residents.

The healthcare organization and academic nursing programs provide qualified educators / teachers to enable
the entry-to-practice nursing residency program to achieve your mission, goals, and expected outcomes. The educators / teachers of the program are qualified and promote the achievement of the mission, goals and expected results of the program.

Standard III: Program Quality – Curriculum

The practice entry nurse residency programs curriculum focuses on the management and delivery of quality patient care and professional role and leadership. Care delivery focuses on quality and safety, patient- and family-centered care, management of patient care delivery, management of the patient’s changing condition, communication and conflict management, and computing and technology.

Professional role and leadership focus on professional development, performance improvement, evidence-based practice (for undergraduate and MEPN residents), ethical decision-making, stress management, and the business of care medical.

III-A. Management and Provision Of Quality Patient Supply

The provision of services is proven through the planning, implementation and coordination of care for the patient, the family or other persons who are important for the patient. Residents have the skills to safely deliver and manage patient care to achieve high quality patient outcomes.

Nurse Residency Programs
Nurse Residency Programs

Residents are responsible for evaluating patient care outcomes, including critical considerations and using evidence to analyze the effects of care.

The residents evaluate the causes of errors and how the institution deals with errors. Residents understand the facility’s quality improvement process and participate in quality improvement efforts.

Residents are sensitive and respect patients and families, including their values ​​and health practices.

The provision of services includes the prioritization of care as well as the appropriate delegation and monitoring of certain care functions by other members of the interprofessional team.

Language and communication are important components of safe patient care. The effective use of computing and technology is essential to providing high quality patient care.

III-B. Professional Role And Leadership

Leadership, an essential function of professional nursing, is demonstrated through professional identity and practice accountability. The program should develop residents’ ability to make change to promote health. Residents must commit to planning and developing their careers, including the opportunity to obtain professional certification and undergo formal training.

As professionals, residents commit to lifelong learning, increasing performance and maintaining evidence-based practice. Residents recognize that clinical decision-making reflects ethics and values, as well as science and technology. The residents recognize and manage their personal stress level in order to cope with situational stress effectively. The business of
Health care is an important concept that residents need to understand and incorporate into their practice.

Standard IV: Program Effectiveness:

Evaluation and achievement of program results

The entry-level nurse residency programs are effective in fulfilling its mission and goals, as evidenced by the achievement of the expected program results. Evaluation data show the effectiveness of the program. Data on the effectiveness of the program will be used to drive the continuous improvement of the program

Standard Development Process

The standards committee has used the following points of reference for its work:

  • Standards for Accreditation of Entry-Level Nursing Programs (CCNE, 2015)
  • Common Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Doctoral-Level Competencies (AACN, 2017)
  • “Towards a Common Taxonomy of Competency Areas for Health Professions and Competencies for Physicians” (Englander et al, Academic Medicine, 2013)